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ARTH101: Activities & Discussion


#1

Post activity responses to Art Appreciation and Techniques here & discuss :sunglasses:


ARTH101:Art Appreciation Lesson 1.1 issues
Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #2: A Definition for Art” Link: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #2:
Introductions
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#2

Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #1: Expose Yourself to Art”
Link: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #1: Expose Yourself to Art” (HTML)

Instructions: What has been your exposure to visual art? Has it been primarily from your family? School? Social activities? Personal explorations? Do you make art? If so, what kind? What is the medium you use? What kind of style is it? Look under “style” in module 1 to get a better idea of what it might be. Who is your audience? If you haven’t made any art, have you ever wanted to? What kind?

I’ve had exposure to visual art from many different pathways. Both of my parents enjoy art; my dad from a appreciation stand point and my mom from a making/doing stand point. Up until high school I took as many art classes as possible; painting, drawing, ceramics, print making. And later I spent one year studying fashion design. Although I didn’t end up taking an artistic career path I enjoy doing art in my spare time, mostly some form of pop art or folk art, nothing in the fine arts area.


#3

Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #2: A Definition for Art”
Link: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #2: A Definition for Art” (HTML)

Instructions: Do you agree with the definition for ‘art’ as it’s explained in module 1? Why or why not? Can you add to the definition? Is your definition coming from a subjective or objective perspective?.

“The conscious use of skill and creative imagination especially in the
production of aesthetic objects.”

Well I would say that this definition is somewhat applicable, but definitely not all encompassing and can quite easily be deconstructed. I think the biggest flaw in this definition is the fact that it emphasizes art as physical objects. We know that much of art is in some kind of performance or ephemeral display. I think the idea of creative imagination is also problematic because not all art is imaginative or creative in the strictest sense. Duchamp’s Fontaine for example, might be an imaginative reincarnation for an old urinal, but isn’t creative in the sense that something was created except a new perspective. I’m not entirely decided on the “conscious use of skill”. On the one hand you can use your skill to make something, but you could also consciously not use skill to make something (that is art, or that you can call art).

So my suggested definition: Art: something that is called art.

I guess thats objective, its definitely not subjective.


#4

Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: Learning Activities: “Worksheet #1

Instructions: Find a work of art to answer the following questions. The artwork can be from any culture or time period.

Provide the title, date and artist’s name. Make sure your source has all of this information.
What medium is used (painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, photograph or digital image, video, installation or performance)?
Give a short description of the work:
Is it realistic, abstract or non-objective?
What does it depict? What colors are used?
What category does it fall under?
What artistic role does it play? Does it take on more than one role? Review the different roles discussed in Module 1 to help you decide.

Femme à l’Éventail (Woman with a Fan), 1912
Jean Metzinger
oil on canvas, 90.7 x 64.2 cm

This painting is, as the name indicates, of a woman with a fan. It looks as if she is sitting in front of a window or perhaps on a balcony, as there are buildings in the background with windows. This is an abstract painting so you can get an idea of what is going on, but you aren’t necessarily certain. While the overall color pallet is fairly subdued, off whites and highlights of warm tones, shadows, there are quite vibrant accents in the woman’s clothing; bright blue polkadots and a red belt, and the green chair she is sitting on which takes up a large portion of the painting.

This definitely falls under fine art.

I’m not exactly sure what role this painting plays (and other abstract/cubist paintings). On the one hand its a portrait of a woman and a particular scene. But I think it also plays some role of offering a different perspective on how to see the world, a perspective that the average person might not see or understand.


#5

Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: Learning Activities: “Activity #1: Style, Form, and Content”

Instructions: Artistic styles change over time and throughout cultures, yet some forms continue to be repeated despite the changes. Examining these forms helps in finding the meaning.

View the three works of art from the hyperlinks below. They are all from different time periods and cultures. Notice how each one has a repeated formal element similar to the others.

What style and category does each work belong to?
Do these similarities have ties to a common meaning between all of them, or do you think the meaning for each work is separate from the others? Why or why not?
What cultural, religious or other considerations do you take into account in defining your answers?
Write at least one paragraph to explain each work of art.
Here are the images to view:

Totem Pole
Giotto Crucifix
Minoan Snake Goddess

What style and category does each work belong to?
Do these similarities have ties to a common meaning between all of them, or do you think the meaning for each work is separate from the others? Why or why not?
What cultural, religious or other considerations do you take into account in defining your answers?
Write at least one paragraph to explain each work of art.
Here are the images to view:

Totem Pole
The Totem Pole is a little tricky to answer for because I’m not sure if we are looking at the Totem Pole itself, or rather the photograph. I guess the Totem Pole would fall under the decorative arts, and strangely, the photography would probably fall under fine art(although I don’t really stand by that). Pictured is a totem pole with two animals, on the bottom is man, and on top is a bird, it looks like an owl. Assuming its actually the physical Totem Pole I should be thinking about and not the photograph, it very culturally tied to the native americans of the pacific northwest. As for any religious implications, I think we would need more information, I believe that some totem poles are made for ceremonial purposes, but others are made purely as art.
Giotto Crucifix
Here was have a cross with jesus crucified, highly religious and decorative, with detailed patterns in gold.
Minoan Snake Goddess
This is a ceramic woman holding a snake in either hand. It is probably for religious purposes, so decorative art as well. She appears to be wearing some sort of head dress, and it almost looks like there is an animal sitting on her head. She is wearing some sort of traditional clothing and but appears to be bare chested. Her skirt is tiered and has a shorter panel over it which looks like an apron.

Each of these works seems to be decorative in nature and potentially religious. These are all fairly stylized (a cultural thing). All three also depict a human. I’m not sure how much more meaning I should derive from these…


#6

Unit 2 Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #3: The Artistic Process”
Link: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #3: The Artistic Process” (HTML)

Instructions: The Artistic Process. Who makes art? Do you think artists have innate ability or acquired skill (or both)? How do artist’s roles change with different cultural considerations? Support your answers with examples, and provide any links or images that help in your explanations.

Response:
Lots of people make art. There’s probably even a case to be made for everyone making art at some point in their life with a broad enough definition of art. Someone might even unknowingly make art; something they make might be considered art by someone else, but not by themselves. But generally speaking, I think there are those who make art because they are compelled by an idea, those who feel that they are good at it, those who enjoy a particular process, others yet who do it out of practicality, a utilitarian need, and probably a million other reasons.

As far as “innate ability or acquired skill”, there is probably a wide spectrum. Theres a certain amount of acquired skill that is inherent in the process of making something. No matter if you study at a top art school or simply create, you will undoubtedly learn by doing. Learning in an academic setting teaches you skills that are respected and expected in a particular culture. I would say that innate ability borders on being myth, but at the same time, I believe that some people might be better at somethings than others to start out with, but that is something that can be easily overcome with training. For example, I might have been a better drawer as a kid because I more patiently observed the world, and that positive feedback for being good at drawing might have instilled in me an interest in art, as opposed to someone who wasn’t patient and was frustrated with drawing, but any difference in ability would be null after the same amount of training later on (I think).

How do artist’s roles change with different cultural considerations?
I’m not really sure what this question is asking or maybe its just too broad. But I’m going to interpret it as, art being controlled by what a culture values. So there are cases of only a certain type of art being valued by a culture, for example commercial art, so graphic design, movies, etc. In this case art for the sake of art is either ignored, or not created (in as much volume), but there is a proliferation of art that helps make money. I think a better, more specific example would be (the opposite situation) PWA/FAP murals of the great depression. During this time employment was on the mind and that meant for everyone, even artists. The government employed thousands of artists to do works of public art. So this this cultural focus on getting out of the depression was a catalyst for a large body of work during the 30’s and also contributed to the subject matter, a lot of murals were of WPA workers in industrial or agricultural scenes.


#7

Discussion Q1 Expose yourself to Art.

I feel lucky to live near a city which has several museums and art galleries with free entrance to their permanent collections. Frequent visits, reading and a few courses have encouraged me to want to learn more about how I can express my personal opinion on what I see. I don’t paint or make sculpture now though I did at school. Creativity for me now is more practical rather than ‘art for art’s sake’


#8

Q2 A definition for art:

I agree with the definition as described on P1 because of its breadth. For a work to be described as Art the subject matter has to be original ‘seeing the extraordinary in the ordinary’. It requires the observer to have an emotional response to it, validating a society’s existence in time and yet it must be timeless. Because the nature of society is in constant flux, it is impossible to give a static definition allowing other ideas, media and subject matter hitherto unknown to be incorporated.

In my opinion, the definition is objective.


#9

Answer to the question #1 Expose yourself to Art. of the course ARTH101
What has been your exposure to visual art?
-I have benn exposed to Art for as long as I can remember. Some of my first memories regarding this matter is watching for long moments repeatedly to a seascape reproduction hanging on our livingroom.
Has it been primarily from your family? School? Social activities? Personal explorations?

  • Primarily from family, then all the rest in more or less the order stated. I remember myself reading art books or getting absorbed by art images in any book available.
    Do you make art? If so, what kind? What is the medium you use? What kind of
    style is it?
    -Yes, I do paint, I did some sculpting too. It is mostly oil on canvas/wood. Figurative painting. The subject could be anything, from portrait to lanscape or a scene.
    Who is your audience?
    -My audience would be anyone in the internet who drops by my work and the people who go to any of the exhibitions I participated in. Primarily my acquaintances.

#10

Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #4: Art21”
Link: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #4: Art21” (HTML)

Instructions: View at least five short videos from Art21. You can search for artist’s names by alphabet at the top middle of Art21’s homepage. Watch how they work and what they say about their process. Then place one artist in each of the following categories: (Note: It is possible that these videos may only be viewable in the United States)

Artist most concerned with the process of making the work.
Artist most concerned with creativity in the idea for their art or the work itself.
Artist most concerned with materials
Who surprised you the most?
List the artists you viewed.


#11

I wasn’t able to watch the episodes from the website because of regional restrictions (I’m not in the US), but I did manage to watch videos on youtube. However, I mostly watched videos from the “New York Close Up” series because the videos seemed to be a little bit longer than the others.

Artist most concerned with the process of making the work
This is a really hard question to answer, but I would have to say Alejandro because at times, his process is his art. He constructs sculptures that are pushing the boundaries of collapse. So in order to make a successful sculpture that doesn’t fall over, the process of experimenting is really important to his work. But I also felt that the process was really important for Jacolby. He makes freaky, animated, hyper sexual, sci-fi, fantasy worlds which you would think would be created solely in a studio with a computer, but actually a large part of his process is going out into the public wearing a freaky costume complete with movement recorders which he then takes back to his studio and works with. Something that he said that really struck me was that he was taking the avatar out of the digital world, and using it in the real world. When he is just Jacolby, he is a pretty shy guy, but when he is in character, he is really outgoing, almost exhibitionist, without actually being naked.
Artist most concerned with creativity in the idea for their art or the work itself
I guess that in the group of artists that I saw, Mika thought most about the creativity in the work. The other artists more or less just followed through with ideas and experimented, where as Mika seemed to really think about how to make really normal situations or objects more fantastical.
Artist most concerned with materials
This is also a hard question to answer because it could mean several things. On the one hand, Diana was really concerned with how to manipulate the few materials that she used, plaster, fiberglass, and metal to appear to defy gravity. And Marela was very concerned with keeping track of her paints, meticulously cataloguing them. But for me Alejandro had the deepest connection to his materials. For starters, he didn’t limit himself at all to mediums or materials. He explored that capabilities of different materials and let that dictate his work.
Who surprised you the most?
Jacolby surprised me the most because I had initially wrote him and his work off as overly relying on sex to be appealing or interesting, but its not that at all. He is really talented at his animation and has a really strong point of view (his queer identity and queerness in general) which he is exploring and playing with in his work.
List the artists you viewed
Mika Rottenberg
Alejandro Almanza Pereda
Marela Zacarías
Diana Al-Hadid
Jacolby Satterwhite


#12

Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Worksheet #2
Link: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Worksheet #2” (HTML)

Instructions: Compare and contrast art created as a social activity and as a singular creative act.

What are the differences?
Why are they important?
Do their functions ever overlap? How?


#13

:rabbit:


#14

The Lascaux Caves in South Western France are worthy of consideration since there are about 2000 figures represented and they are more than 17,300 years old. They are Paleolithic cave paintings featuring mainly animals including stags, cattle and bison. There are also human beings and abstract signs. Minerals were used to paint the cave walls and included the colours red, yellow, black, brown and violet. The broad black outlines were made with either moss or hair. As there were no brushes the paint was blown either from the mouth of the artist or a tube. They are huge and when first discovered in 1940 still astonishingly vibrant and energetic. Since their discovery, however, the air circulation has damaged the pigment so they are now closed to the public but can be seen online. The images are naturalistic and sophisticated in the way the animals appear to be moving.

It is believed that these paintings have more than one role: they may record real life events of hunting or, because of their size, have a spiritual connection as these could be ceremonial chambers.The interior of the caves are dark but light falls on them at certain periods and this could suggest an astronomical connection - they may be pre-historic star charts.


#15

Q: What has been your exposure to visual art? Has it been primarily from your family? School? Social activities?
A: My first exposure to visual art came as a child reading books and looking at photographs. In grade school art was drawing and finger painting. Beginning in fifth grade I took music in school and a photography class in high school. In college I took several art courses.
Q: Personal explorations? Do you make art? If so, what kind? What is the medium you use? What kind of style is it? Look under “style” in module 1 to get a better idea of what it might be.
A: Photography is my chosen medium for art, and primarily use black and white. Naturalistic is the predominant style per definition in module 1.
Q: Who is your audience?
A: It would be easy to answer “myself” but that is only partially true. Very few people only make art for themselves, despite any claims they may make to the contrary. To be very honest, I want to hone my talent and someday exhibit or perhaps work professionally.


#16

Q: What has been your exposure to visual art? Has it been primarily from your family? School? Social activities?
A:I had participated in most of the Social activities in Elementary school.We used to draw and sketch a lot.My favorite artistic activity was the combination of both,my love for Geography and drawing-painting Geophysical Maps.
Recently, I discovered that through Art History you learning more Geography and that makes it more exciting.
Also I took Classical Sculpture courses including portraiture and mold constructions.
Q: Personal explorations? Do you make art? If so, what kind? What is the medium you use? What kind of style is it? Look under “style” in module 1 to get a better idea of what it might be.
A:Classical and Modern sculpture is the style I love most.Collage is another way I find interesting to engage with Art.
Q: Who is your audience?
A:Many times I made Art for myself and it’s not always easy making profit.I participated in a few exhibitions with other artists to share the rent amount that needed for each event.
I used my techniques to work at a studio and create plaster decorative products for a company.I find it more easier for me, to collaborate with others, or work for others.
The most advantage by making art is to realize that everything is information and while you creating you getting rid of most of your thoughts and you feel free.


#17

These three images are representations of contrasting cultures at different periods in our world history. None of them is unique in itself; there are many totem poles, figures of Christ on the cross and there also appear to be several snake goddesses discovered. All the images appear to have a connection with death and burial rights.

The totem pole shown is situated in the open air in Namgis Burial Grounds and poles of this nature are used to house the ashes of an important person in a clan. Presumably this would be housed in the thunderbird figure surmounting the pole. This is definitely the largest of the three images [almost six feet] and made from a large cedar tree. Natural pigments were used to paint it and the predominant white pigment represents purity, peace and death. It is also the most recently made of all three images.

The crucifix in Santa Maria Novella Church in Florence dates from 1288 and is 578 x 406cm. It is similar to the totem pole in that it is made of wood but also uses tempura, oil and glass. It contrasts markedly with the totem pole in that Christ’s face is painted realistically and his body is life-like with a sagging belly. While it symbolises the death of Christ, it is different from the pole in that it is an object of worship. The congregation is minded to focus on the suffering of Christ during a service in church. Unlike the other two images, this crucifix is revered because of the artist: Giotto, the first of Italian Renaissance artists.

By far the oldest of the three images is the Minoan Snake Goddess dating from approximately 1600BC. It is the smallest of the three images [34.3cm] and is housed in the Palace of Knossos in Crete. It’s made of clay with quartz paste and then fired in a clay oven giving the figure its shine. Because of the age of the figure, it is difficult to exactly ascertain its purpose: is it part of a fertility rite? However, the baring of breasts are said to be a sign of mourning [?] and the snakes a symbol of the reborn dead. She does have some kind of wild cat on her head. Her dress is fashionable and her face life-like [again in contrast to the totem pole]. However, the use of wild animals would suggest a similarity to the totem pole in that they are used to represent either emotions or to symbolise a purpose.


#18

Q: Do you agree with the definition for ‘art’ as it’s explained in module 1? Why or why not? Can you add to the definition? Is your definition coming from a subjective or objective perspective?.
A: Yes, I agree with it because I think that it gives a cogent definition of art and how it is a unique human endeavor. I also like it separates art as an idea separate and distinct from the medium in which it is expressed. I don’t know that I could add to the definition so much as expand upon it by taking the position that art is very much confessional in nature because it reveals something about the person and his or her experiences in life. This is a subjective statement because art is, by nature, subjective.


#19

Learning activity worksheet 1

I chose to examine Office in a Small City by Edward Hopper, a painting from 1953. The artistic style is realistic. It depicts a solitary male figure seated at a desk looking out over an urban landscape. Blue and white are the predominant colors, with yellows and reds also found. This is an example of the Fine Art category. I would call this an environmental portrait as well as an example of an urban landscape.

I very much admire his style, his choice of subjects and his use of light. His paintings show a kinship to photography and viewing them has had a significant impact in shaping my vision as a photographer.


#20

Learning activity worksheet 1

I admire a lot Edward Hopper for his paintings and I love urban landscape.I find remarkable the lighthouses near coasts in some of his paintings and he is my favorite American Painter.Many of his artworks giving me a wrong impression that he used pastels instead of oils.
For this activity I chose The Lac D’ Annecy by Paul Cezanne,the forerunner of Cubism.The style he used was simultaneously avant-garde and post-impressionism while with his short brushstrokes he used to create three dimensional shapes.The landscape including this lake is tricky and unthinkable to interpret because it’s not day,you don’t see lights,but everything is reflected on lake’s surface.
The mountains look like sculpted and most of the colors are dark.
It is said that Picasso influenced by Paul Cezanne and both of them created statues as well.