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ARTH101: Activities & Discussion


#21

My art activity consists of going to museums and galleries, attending lectures etc at Museum of Fine Arts Boston, collecting art, particularly etchings, Islamic art and Chinese scholar’s rocks, reading art fiction and nonfiction. When I travel I make a point of visiting museums, particularly Islamic art. I’ve never created art except for piano lessons as a child. My parents, grandparents and other relatives had no particular interest in art.

I’m also a fan of classical music, attending concerts and listening to records.


#22

Webster’s New Collegiate dictionary defines art as “The conscious use of skill and creative imagination especially in the production of aesthetic objects.”

This is incomplete inasmuch as an idea does not become art until it has been communicated to another person. Beethoven composed his symphonies in his head but they did not become works of art until he transcribed his ideas onto paper. Beethoven died almost 200 years ago, yet we follow his musical thoughts through printed scores which have a physical solidity and through performance which converts his ideas to sound waves which we hear.

Unfortunately when you start considering specific forms of art it frequently become difficult to fit a specific object into the definition. Half Dome is a marvelous natural formation in Yosemite National Park. It was not created in the mind of man so it cannot be a work of art. But what about an accurate photograph of the formation? If it impinges on a viewers consciousness in exactly the same way as a view “in the flesh” the image is not art. But Ansel Adams created photographs of the formation when it was lighted in certain ways or when the moon could be seen above the rock. These are art.

Thus “art” will have to remain beyond the realm of strict definition like “virtue” and “beauty” among many other concepts.


#23

What has been your exposure to visual art?

  • My elementary school was a generally artsy place and I started doing art from there in our mandatory art classes. We mostly did drawings and were sometimes made to express our feelings via our art. I also took extra art classes after school for a year or two with the same teacher. In another class, starting from fourth grade, we were introduced to stitching/sewing, and in sixth grade we made a stool (whose wood we sawed and sanded ourselves) that we had to carve patterns into.
    Has it been primarily from your family? School? Social activities? Personal explorations?
  • Other than in school, I try to draw in my free time. I also occasionally draw outfits as I’m somewhat interested in fashion design.
    Do you make art? If so, what kind? What is the medium you use? What kind of style is it?
  • Drawings, for the most part, although I don’t practise as much as I should. I suppose naturalistic would be the style my art falls under.
    Who is your audience?
  • I’m still trying to figure out my drawing style so currently I have no audience other than myself.

#24

Do you agree with the definition for ‘art’ as it’s explained in module 1? Why or why not? Can you add to the definition? Is your definition coming from a subjective or objective perspective?

  • I agree with the definition given in Module 1 because it tells us what we do with art and what art does to us. Since many things fall under ‘art’ and everyone sees art differently, it’s not really something we can simply define. As many others have said, art is subjective, so an objective definition of it is and always will be lacking. Though words can become part of art, art is something words cannot put justice to.

#25

Unit 1.7 Worksheet #1

I knew once I read the activity details that I wanted to do one of BenCab’s artworks. The one I chose is a painting called Ninuno, which is displayed in his art museum near Baguio. (I visited it the last time I was in Baguio almost two years ago.) I couldn’t find the date the painting was made, but if/when I do I’ll edit it in. The word ninuno is the Tagalog word for ancestor. The realistic painting, whose colours are mostly muted and grimy, depicts five tribal Filipino faces. This painting falls under the category of fine arts. I believe other than being a portrait, it’s also a narrative that shows the indigenous culture of the northern Philippines.


#26

Hello Jenny,it is said that Minoan Snake Goddess is connected with the 6God-Minoic religion long earlier than the ancient 12God religion of mount Olympus.
The basic 6God Minoic Religion was:
1)Mother Goddess:Goddess of Nature
2)Velhanos or Yakinthos:Son of Mother Goddess and tamer.
3)Zeus the Cretan:God of greenery
4)Diktinna:Goddess of wild nature of mountains
5)Vritomartis:Goddess of Virgin Women
6)Eileithuia:Goddess of childbirth

According to Myth, Zeus was powerful and his home was Crete.His looking was youth without bears,he dies and reborn every year,with flames coming out from his cave.On the other hand Zeus of Olympus was the opposite,elderly with long bears and immortal.
Zeus(the Cretan) had a children with Europe the Mythical King Minoas of Knossos, the city and the house of this beautiful statue.
Snake is the archetypal and phallic symbol of many mythologies and the baring of breasts probably symbolizes fertility.I agree that its difficult to interpret everything about it,but it looks like that it used for ritual purposes,or simply Minoans expressed their love for Mother Goddess by creating her idol.


#27

Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #3: The Artistic Process”

Link: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #3: The Artistic Process” (HTML)

Instructions: The Artistic Process. Who makes art? Do you think artists have innate ability or acquired skill (or both)? How do artist’s roles change with different cultural considerations?

Different people have different artistic skill levels; from those who can’t draw a straight line and have no interest in visual images to those great artists whose lives revolved around art and whose work has come to us over many centuries. In that respect, artistic skill is innate but but is expressed in the form of artworks depending on encouragement from parents, teachers, media, and friends. People also have other skills such as math, or literature and those skills may be greater and receive more encouragement from parents or societal forces. Thus a person with good artistic skills may end up being a businessman, athlete, politician, etc. rather than an artist.

The encouragement for a person with high artistic skill to spend his/her life creating art can come from societal influences. For instance, Athens in 450 BC had a large number of artists, sculptors, musicians, playwrights, philosophers, scientists, mathematicians, engineers and architects.These people were highly respected and well paid. Considering that Athens had a population of about 40,000 male citizens along with about 60,000 women, slaves and foreigners, the city probably had a higher proportion of these highly skilled people than modern cities like New York, London and Paris. Florence in the 15th and 16th centuries also had a similarly high proportion of highly skilled artists and other professionals.

People with very high artistic skills (actually other areas like math and chess also) frequently demonstrate their capabilities at very early ages. Mozart wrote his first symphony at age 6, his first opera at age 11. Giotto, at age ten could draw a perfect circle without a compass. He was a shepherd who spent his time drawing pictures of the animals on flat rocks. Cimabue a contemporary artist saw his work and was so impressed that he invited him to become an apprentice. None of Giotto’s early work survives but as an adult he designed the campanile of the Florence cathedral and completely covered the walls of the arena chapel in Padua with frescoes. Michaelangelo created the two reliefs, the madonna of the stairs and the battle of the centaurs when he was 16 or 17. Picasso’s professional career began when he was 11


#28

Hi Petdavis,

Thank you so much for the background here. I had to look up the Minoan Snake Goddess and got the reference to both mourning and fertility from Wikipedia but they do seem to contradict each other!

Great to have some interaction among us all and am certainly getting round the web looking up references to complete the tasks given to us. Where did you find this info?

Jenny


#29

Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #3: The Artistic Process”

Link: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #3: The Artistic Process” (HTML)

Instructions: The Artistic Process. Who makes art? Do you think artists have innate ability or acquired skill (or both)? How do artist’s roles change with different cultural considerations?

From my perspective I have noticed that people with artistic skills from childhood are creative in more than one area.I had a friend that he used to play with his quitar Black Sabbath’s “Paranoid”,drawing 3D images from his own fantasy when he was seven years old!and all this with his left hand.
He was solving difficult math exercises and his parents were very well educated scientists.Finally he became an agriculturist and he gave up playing in two rock-bands.
While many parents pushing their children to follow the artist’s career,in some way kids react negatively while they are not old enough to decide or getting bored.
In the year 2006 I met a graduate and a very well respected teacher.He was teaching in a private school, visual arts and simultaneously he run his own School Of Visual Arts,afternoon and evening classes.We had a conversation and he proved me in some way that nobody was born special than others and you are the one who creates your talent after years of hard work.
In his classes were enrolled adult,married students with great drawing and painting skills(pastel,charcoal,watercolors,acrylics).Adults I mean more than 40years old.

Italian famous artists like DaVinci, famous while he was eleven years old,if my memory serves me well,were probably the 2%of the artistic population,if this is a good example to give and he had skills in more areas than painting or sculpture.He was also an inventor.
Wassili Kandinsky created a lot of circles.Do you think he used a divider for his circles?

Regarding Art in the cities, it is obvious that things changed a lot while New York seems to carry the crown of Arts and London too.


#30

I found them in a Cretan educative site written in Greek
www.slideshare.net/antkoniou/0-44605702 page76
www.slideshare.net/conmo/08-09 page7

The first one reffers to the 6God Minoic Religion and the second one about the Myth of Zeus’s and Europe’s marriage.

If you click en.wikipedia.org/wiki/snake-Goddess you can find out about Diktynna.


#31

Instructions: Compare and contrast art created as a social activity and as a singular creative act.

Singular: Still life painting: Adriaen Coorte’s Strawberries in a Wan Li Bowl
Social: Day of the Dead Celebration

Both are resources from the assignment

With the day of the dead we see a culturally significant day that is celebrated with the creation of many works of folk art which are made within communities and families. This is something that is done out of tradition and respect and remembrance of the dead. The art that surrounds this communal celebration of death are not meant to be works of fine art, but rather many small symbolic gestures that welcome and pay respect to the dead.

The still life painting of a bowl of strawberries on the other hand, seems primarily an exercise in aesthetics. The painter, Coorte, seems to be challenging himself to paint realistically with special attention to the lighting. Perhaps this is also more of a commercial work of art.

What are the differences?
Art created as a social activity usually has a purpose or a message and is typically meant to be displayed publicly, possibly to represent a community or a group of people. Art created as a singular act can have a purpose and be displayed publicly too, but that isn´t necessarily so or typical. Singular art can at times seem random viewed out of context or maybe its just more about aesthetics, ie, something beautiful.

Why are they important?
Obviously both forms are important but perhaps for varying reasons. Social art tends to bring art to people, its more accessible both in creation, location and subject (often but not always). It also tends to be bigger in scale, both physically and in scope. Singular art tends to be less restrained (much more open to controversy) and is perhaps is more vast, because less planning and preparation is required for singular art (typically)

Do their functions ever overlap? How?
Of course some functions will overlap, both things feed our desire for visual experiences. Hopefully both things are engaging and make you think. Sometimes both things beautify a space, or enhance it. Both things act as an activity for the creator(s) (hopefully positive).


#32

Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #1: Expose Yourself to Art”

What has been your exposure to visual art? Has it been primarily from your family? School? Social activities? Personal explorations? Do you make art? If so, what kind? What is the medium you use? What kind of style is it? Look under “style” in module 1 to get a better idea of what it might be. Who is your audience? If you haven’t made any art, have you ever wanted to? What kind?

I have always appreciated art, but not always understood it, and have probably spent more time looking at it than comprehending it. My dad was an artist, but I was really only exposed to his art, and didn’t really interest myself in learning about art as a young adult. My desire to learn more about art is directly related to where I am currently living - Paris. I have a membership to the Louvre and go and spend a few hours there every week. The collection at the Louvre is so varied and spans so much of our history that it demands that the viewer understand the fundamentals of art. I am taking this course to really maximize my exposure and understanding while living here and for the rest of my life.


How has your environment motivated you to get your education, Saylor or otherwise?
#33

Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #3: The Artistic Process”

Who makes art? Do you think artists have innate ability or acquired skill (or both)?

Many people see beautiful things as art, natural things like the sunrise or a flower, and sometimes we make them into our own kind of art. Artists aren’t necessarily born as artists: some people are born artistic, some aren’t, but both become greater artists by training. Art is not something you can perfect, it’s a constant learning process. But generally, the artistically inclined learn faster and thus become better faster than those who aren’t.


#34

I totally agree with you and I find amazing" The Waves" sandstone in border of Arizona and Utah.The most surrealistic formation I have ever seen and a miracle of nature.


#35

Unit 2.1 The Artistic Process
As discussed in unit 1, art is a uniquely human endeavor so therefore I would have to say “people” make art. But art takes many forms be it painting, drawing, sculpture, dance, photography, graphic design, cooking, embroidery, pottery, etc. I think as humans we are born with an innate ability to create art and this is manifested early in the child who draws on the wall with crayons, colors in a coloring book, sculpts figures with play-doh or makes finger paintings for art class in school. A little girl who dresses up in her mother’s clothes and plays tea party is an example of a child exercising her creative imagination to express her experiences and view on the world through acting. Where art starts to become acquired is when the person grows from childhood into older childhood and adolescence; if he wants to pursue an artistic outlet he finds that he must do something more “serious” or “meaningful” in order to be taken seriously as an artist. It is at this point that art becomes “hard” in the sense that it’s not something that just anyone can do.

In African cultures the artisans who made masks (figure 1), bowls or pottery were valued for the practical skills in meeting the needs of the society in which they dwelt. In western societies, during the Middle Ages artists were valued for their ability to paint murals, for example, that adorned cathedrals (decorative) and taught lessons from scripture (figure 2). In the modern world artists are still valued for their ability to create decorative works of art, but there is also the notion of art for art’s sake that seeks to exalt art and set it apart from any utilitarian or didactic function (figure 3).

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 3


ARTH101: Discussion Topic 3, The Artistic Process
#36

2.2 The Individual Artist

  • Artist most concerned with creativity in the idea for their art or the work itself.
    Robert Adams

  • Artist most concerned with the process of making the work.
    Sally Mann

  • Artist most concerned with materials.
    Cindy Sherman

  • Who surprised you the most?
    Graciela Iturbide

  • List the artists you viewed.
    Robert Adams
    Graciela Iturbide
    Maya Lin
    Cindy Sherman
    Sally Mann


#37

2.2 The Individual Artist

a)Artist most concerned with creativity in the idea for their art or the work itself.
Mark Dion
b)Artist most concerned with the process of making the work.
Eleanor Antin
c)Artist most concerned with materials.
Ann Hamilton
d)Who surprised you the most?
Do-Ho-Suh
e)List the artists you viewed.
Mark Dion
Eleanor Antin
Ann Hamilton
Do-Ho-Suh
Beryl Korot
Elizabeth Murray


#39

Activity: The Washington State Board for Community and
Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #2: A
Definition for Art” Link: The Washington State Board for Community and
Technical Colleges: Art Appreciation: “Discussion Question #2:

Continuing the discussion from ARTH101: Activities & Discussion
It is hard to define Art, as it is to define life for example, nevertheless it defines us somehow.
I do agree with the definition of Art espressed in the Module 1
I would define Art as the group of artistic plastic elements arranged in a
way to express thoughts, ideas and feelings. This is comming from what I
could call objective perspective as it is taken from other sources
through formal study. Although the very adjective of objective is
dangerously proclive to arise from a subjective impression.
I also could add that beauty is a very hard concept to define, but my feelings
towards art and what I could consider artwork vary from the common
inherited face of beauty I learned prior my formal education. Beauty can
be a path to express art, but there are also many other attempts also
valid to my understanding of art.


#40

“Discussion Question #1: Expose Yourself to Art” (HTML)

Instructions:
What has been your exposure to visual art?
My exposure to visual art has been expansive. I took an Art History class while I was in college and it taught me so much, helping me see humanity in a different light. I love visual art now because of this class. As I am primarily a writer, I now rely heavily on paintings and graphic design to get a feel for my work.

Has it been primarily from your family?
Actually, I suppose I could say that family had something to do with my interest in visual arts. My father is a skilled painter and has painted several acrylics, which I was exposed to at a very young age. My love for visual art definitely has its root from my father. I am thankful for him, I wouldn’t be the art lover I am today if it weren’t for his love for art.

School? Social activities? Personal explorations? Do you make art? If so, what kind? What is the medium you use? What kind of style is it? Look under “style” in module 1 to get a better idea of what it might be. Who is your audience? If you haven’t made any art, have you ever wanted to? What kind?
College was my exposure to art and the different mediums used in it. No social activities have really fueled my interest in it. I have done many personal explorations of art. Especially for my stories that I write. Recently, I looked up pastoral paintings as inspiration for my work. I make some art, but not very much. But when I do draw, I draw manga because I love the style and the amount of work that goes into it. My medium is usually pencil. But sometimes I’ll use colored pencil. My audience is myself as I’m not comfortable showing people my manga drawings. As for painting, I haven’t done much of that, but I really want to try my hand at Impressionism, or even Oil painting like what Thomas Kinkade does. His paintings really are beautiful, even if they are commercial and somewhat overrated. Oil paintings in general have a certain magical charm that speaks to me. I would love to learn how to paint with oil instead of acrylic.


#41

Instructions Q#2 Definition of Art:

Do you agree with the definition for ‘art’ as it’s explained in module 1? Why or why not? Can you add to the definition? Is your definition coming from a subjective or objective perspective?

I do agree with the definition for as it is explained in the module. I agree with it mainly because art is a human and social construct designed for our better understanding of he way the world works. We cannot always communicate with one another directly through our languages, as every culture has a different language, but art is the primal and most influential form of communication in the world. It is what defines us as people and drives us to ponder our humanity and also our mortality. I would say my definition is coming from a broad perspective and not an objective one as I am not really an artist by nature. However, I strongly think that art is different to everyone. Someone will see something and the other will see something totally opposite, which is normal. It is part of being human and it is our roles as students and art lovers to look at every angle of art in an objective way. I agree with the module, as it says that the more informed you are with art and its purposes, the more likely you are to love art and understand it on a larger scale than just looking at it as merely art.