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COMM411: Unit 4 Discussion


#1
  1. How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?
    The approach to Print Media would be to provide a more in-depth coverage due to they have the space and time for the article. I would fill in most of the gaps and allow them to finish the article. The approach to television would be to use brief quotes and to provide great quality pictures to get my point across. The approach to the Internet would have writing with bits of information targeted at a limited attention span.
  2. What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
    My advice would be to do your homework before the interview. First you need to make sure that you know enough about the reporter to understand what types of questions they like to ask. Make sure you ask yourself those questions ahead of time in order to be prepared. Remember to ask yourself the questions that you don’t want to be asked. Next make sure you know your topic inside and out. Third be on time to the interview and when you are done make sure you have their contact information. Make sure you are available for any follow up questions they might have for you after the interview. Don’t set your expectation to high.
  3. What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
    First try to get to know those your will need in the media. Take them coffee, out to eat or just try to get to know them. Learn all you can about the people you will need in the media so you can be prepared on their expectation such as length of article, when it is due and any other details that could keep you for getting the article printed. Find out what types of stories each one will print so you don’t waste your time or their time with a story they would never print. Always be on time, create accurate articles with no grammar issues and be available immediately for follow up questions. Always be nice and professional.

4.1 How might You change Your approach to Media Relationa based off On the Type of New Outlet
#2

(1) How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?
Print media requires a more in depth approach, with attention focused on making the piece relevant to the current events being covered by the media and written in an inverted pyramid manner to make the editors’ job easier. Similarly, Broadcast Media requires a pitch that directs and captures a viewer’s attention quickly, with a lot of visuals and short audio quotes. Online however, allows for direct contact with consumers and target audiences, so bright and catchy bits of information works best.

(2) What advice would you provide to a news maker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
A person about to be interviewed should be fully informed about the service or product and speak with confidence and passion about it. Gaining enough practice at mock interviews and knowledge of the highs and lows of the product definitely helps the preparation process. Also, dressing appropriately and speaking with enthusiasm is key.

(3) What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
Maintaining a good relationship with the media starts with ensuring that the media kits and pitches that you provide them are clear and reliable along with simple courtesies such as leaving a card for follow up questions or inviting them out for a coffee and conversation.


#3
  1. How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?
    When it comes to print media, I would have articles longer and more detailed due to the fact the people reading it would time on their hands to read. With broadcasting, I could more quickly and to the point with small catchy quotes and things to catch people’s eye. Something like broadcasting would be good during commercials to plant seeds in someone head. Last, online would be good towards targeting a specific audience with small bits of information that would be easy to retain.

  2. What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
    Firs t, just be prepared for any and everything the reporter may ask. Next, have the upmost confidence in what you say and be prepared to back them up if asked to elaborate on them. Also, make sure you are loud and clear so no mistakes are made on quoting you. If mistakes are made, do not be afraid to get them corrected. In addition, make sure you are aware of the topic at hand. Last, make sure you are professional 100% of the interview from the moment you walk in with nicely dress, to the last word out of your mouth and the goodbye handshake.

  3. What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
    First, a consistent and strong communication effort is a must. Poor communication could kill a relationship or at least put a strain on it. Constant talks about articles being worked on and coming to mutual grounds shows maturity which can strengthen the relationship. Also, going out to lunches and other outings and building a real friendship would definitely ensure that productivity of the relationship is not stopped but hopefully does the opposite and prolongs it.


#4

How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)? Print media can generally utilize more details than broadcast or online media, but not in the initial pitch. Be prepared accordingly. Radio and TV may require a spokesperson or statement, and one should be prepared for that. Online media will likely need suitable images for web-publication; again, be prepared.

What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter? Be prepared, be calm, think before answering, and remember the Rather rule.

What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?

Don’t waste their time, always tell the truth, and become a useful resource for them.


#5

How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?
I would change my approach to media relations based on the nature of media being used. Online media relations would require me to be a little more detailed but precise and concise. Broadcast media relations would require me to be more creative by for instance on one hand, considering visual aids or video clips that communicate the message easily (for Television) and on the other hand; for Radio broadcast media relations I would use precise and concise audio quotations that quickly attracts attention. Print media relations would require me to be brief and straight to the point; for instance, by using bullet points so that the message is easily read.

What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
My advice to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter would be to:

-Understand the type of reporter i.e. television reporter, or radio report, or printer media report

-Be knowledgeable enough about the issues around which the interview will be conducted

-Suite the dressing code to the situation in which the interview will be conducted. For example, if the interview is to be recorded on video, dress up in a presentable manner

-Be confident, calm, audible and respectful to the reporter

-Be open to professional use words that would you don’t know (if indeed you have no idea on a given question) or to say ‘I beg your pardon’ if you have not heard the question well

-Be friendly to the reporters but at the same time remain professional

-If you can, have a pen and a note book for you to note down a few things

What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
To ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media, the following steps can be taken:
-Research on the media agencies to understand what the media is interested in most.

-Identify interesting stories or issues or products around which interaction with the media will be made.

-Establish good relationship with the media; for example by creating good and regular communication with the media agencies, respecting the media representatives, courtesy calls/visits, etc.

  • Research on issues that cause engagement with the media to be able to compile and provide accurate information.

#6

What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?

undersatand the reporter
Understand limitations of the journalist
Understand that mistakes occur
Anticipate questions.

What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?

Maintain regular communication and establish a social relationship.


#7
  1. How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?
    *Rethink PR goals, be more attentive to the outcome and impact of things, think more long term narratives than short term.
  2. What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
    *Research the topics of discussion, prior to interview, discuss topics that are off limits, know your targeted audience, and have followups
  3. What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
    *develop relationship with reporters, research history of reporters, punctual, great speller, well spoken and education about todays events

#8

How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?
For a news outlet I would be straightforward and make sure I follow a pyramid format. I could provide additional details as space permits. For broadcast, I would focus on visual media I could use to enhance my information. I would make it shorter as well. For online, I would provide lots of additional research and links to my release that the reader could explore on their own.
What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
I would tell them to make sure they do their homework on what they’re talking about and know their main points to get across. I would also tell them to make sure it is like a conversation and that they have effective transitions to return back to their key points.
What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
I would make sure to follow their deadlines and not send them things last minute. I wouldn’t try to “sell” the reporter and I would provide research and evidence with my releases so that they don’t have to do separate research.


#9

*How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?
Print media requires a more in depth approach, with attention focused on making the piece relevant to the current events being covered by the media and written in an inverted pyramid manner to make the editors’ job easier. Similarly, Broadcast Media requires a pitch that directs and captures a viewer’s attention quickly, with a lot of visuals and short audio quotes. Online however, allows for direct contact with consumers and target audiences, so bright and catchy bits of information works best.
*What advice would you provide to a news maker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
A person about to be interviewed should be fully informed about the service or product and speak with confidence and passion about it. Gaining enough practice at mock interviews and knowledge of the highs and lows of the product definitely helps the preparation process. Also, dressing appropriately and speaking with enthusiasm is key.
*What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
Maintaining a good relationship with the media starts with ensuring that the media kits and pitches that you provide them are clear and reliable along with simple courtesies such as leaving a card for follow up questions or inviting them out for a coffee and conversation.


#10
  1. How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?

Print media enables you to tell your story in longer and deeper sense, however ensure your story get to the point with back-up researches and facts since the audiences/readers will have more time to read and contemplate while reading your stories than other news outlet such as TV, broadcast.

Broadcast: short and clear message, you might only get 2-5 mins from the interview so make the most out of it.

Online: has become important news outlet to approach your audiences, bear in mind, the audiences might ignore so long or not attractive enough type of news. So make sure you will make the audience willing to spend their important times/minutes for your message/story.

  1. What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
  • Be clear, get to the point, be professional yet comfortable to carry the conversation/interview, try to delivery your important messages and avoid be dragging into a chit-chat interview.
  1. What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
  • Be polite, nice and professional when working with the media
  • Think like a reporter
  • Understand the important goals of media

#11

How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?

Each news outlet is unique in some respects. For example, a pitch for a “print” news outlet is going to need to respect the deadline of the publication, it is going to need to be relevant to their audience, well-researched with facts that are sustainable and sourced, well-written and proofed for every grammatical error, and sent specifically to the right person (s) rather than generically broadcast. Further, it will need to be in the proper format, with proper headings, and within the rules of the publication itself (i.e. word count).

With “broadcast” the pitch should contain elements that broadcast editors need. Video is critical, as are really clear photo’s. Much like “print” there will need to be a tremendous respect for the news outlets “rules,” whether stated or unstated. Broadcast pitches should focus more on the story and why it matters to the audience, i.e. how it will benefit the news outlet from running the story (without telling them of course). Again, the facts must be plain and sustainable, sourced, and interestingly shared.

With “online” news outlets the format is quite different. While many of the above element still apply, there are new elements to consider. Length of the pitch drops dramatically, and words and phrases need an uptick of energy. Online is about speed and brevity–a pitch that does not take this into account will not survive. Online pitches are geared more toward sending the reader to the “rest of the story” rather than revealing it all at once.

  1. What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
    My hope, after reading these articles, is that said newsmaker has already been working with a coach. He needs to consider his appearance from head to toe, his message succinctly able to be stated with conversational like tone, and his emotional appearance must be confident even in the face of difficult questions. He should have considered his surroundings carefully so he will be seen in the best possible situation. He need not fear difficult questions and should avoid at all costs answering when he really has no answer. Bridge phrases should be second nature so that it is his point that comes across consistently.

  2. What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
    Like any business, building relationships with people in all facets of life will always pay dividends. Particularly this is the case with media relations. Making oneself “the one to call” who is available anytime go a long, long way to building those relationships. Helping others achieve their goals is a good way to win their trust. Personal meetings, notes of encouragement or congratulations, remembering unique facts/events about others all will go a long way to building the productive relationship with the media folks. Truly it comes down to character–build your character by helping others and you won’t have a problem having an ongoing relationship with most all people in all walks of life.


#12

1. How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?
As we studied in this chapter, there are many differences between different types of media. In any type, I would do my research about the media I’m going to be, make sure I know who is the audience, who is going to be my host, and how does he or she normally work on interviews.
If my news are going to be printed, I could extend a little bit more about the circumstances and how everything develop, who might be affected or any other information that can be interesting for the readers using the inverted pyramid formula. I would leave out personal opinions or irrelevant facts.
If it’s going to be on TV, or in live broadcast, I would take care of my outfit and my personal appearance trying to get on with this type of media where you are going to be viewed by thousands of people. I would prepare all the information I need, to be able to talk about it, and to answer all the possible questions they might ask. I would rehearse my pitch at home, or at work many times. Also, I would bring my product if it’s possible, so I could show what it is about or how does it work. I would try to answer politely to all the questions, and if I don’t know the answer to any question, I wouldn’t lie, I would say that I don’t have that information but I will say something about it as soon as I have form an opinion and something to say about it.
Last but not least, if I have to prepare an online pitch, it would be more dynamic, I could combine images, videos, text (not to much so people don’t get bored), I can also share some links with interesting information, in that way, people could extend their knowledge about the topic. I would be more direct; I could use my personal opinion and be more relaxed, because this is a less formal channel to communicate with our publics.

2. What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
First of all, stay calm and don´t panic. Then, think about who is coming to the interview, what can you know about him or the media he works to. Basically answer this question, why is he coming?
After that, try to anticipate yourself, think about all the possible questions he might ask, and all the possible answers, even those you don’t want to be asked. You have to be prepared.
Finally, take a look at this link that can help you with different tips (https://web.archive.org/web/20160312035530/http://wwmr.us/primer/module5.htm) and make sure you know how to deal with different types of interviewers.

3. What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
First of all, be polite with the media especially with the reporters, try to understand how they work and the pressure they have.
If any media asks for an interview, I would say “of course, thank you very much” I’ll try to help him or her with the information they need, and I would appreciate that they want to hear me out.
If I have any important information that I would like to share with the media, I would send it at the same time to everybody, each information adapted to each media, with the research I already made, so I can help them with the facts, and I would also tell them, that I’m able to have a meeting or an interview if that can help them out.
Finally I would thank them before and after the interview, and if something is wrong (something I didn’t say, or some wrong spelling…) I would call and tell them politely.


#13

1.How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?
The approach I would take to pitch to any media outlet would be catered to the how the source outputs my story. Print, I would ensure that I have detailed resourceful information that I lead the story with, I would give them as much about my story as I can to target the audiences I want reached. I would ensure that my stories are resourceful, quick to fit tight deadlines that reporters have, that I am easily accessible, that I provide high quality images to support my story, and maintain awareness of the communication medium criteria and requirements.
2.What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
I would inform a newsmaker that is about to be interviewed to make effective transitions when speaking to make your key messages heard. Also, flag the audience of important things to remember, and give them the most critical points. This will enable them to more effectively communicate to your audience.
3.What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
Steps to take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media is to remain open minded and available to operate on their terms but to not loose grounds on your goals when working with them. Develop a solid marketing plan and develop your relations with reporters. Don’t be afraid to allow them to lead your story but communicate your story and audience goals.


#14

1. How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?

Changing an approach to a media relations strategy would affect the content, structure and style of writing of PR material (press release/media letter/etc).

For one, print media allows for more in-depth coverage as more time and space are available. More information should be provided. It would be wise to utilise the typical inverted pyramid structure when writing press releases to pitch a story.

Television focuses on visuals, thus the message has to be succinct and attractively packaged. The message that is to be conveyed should never be a sales pitch as the newsmaker is not on television to advertise. As the newsmaker’s appearance influences viewers’ overall perception of the product or service being sold, he should maintain a cool, clean-cut professional image while maintaining acceptable behaviour that would not draw attention away from his message. For instance, fidgeting.

Radio, the most immediate of all types of news outlets, may dull personality and energy levels over the airwaves. It is essential to keep in mind that listeners have no facial cues, no gestures, only a voice. Hence, on radio, it is important to sound enthusiastic and boost one’s voice to the point of sounding silly.

As for the internet, the writing style should be short, with bright bits of information targeted at an audience with a limited attention span.

2. What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?

My first piece of advice to the newsmaker would be to make the interview a conversation and to talk to the host as though sitting in the a living room together. This would allow the newsmaker to feel at ease and comfortable to share information and persuade convincingly. In the event that the reporter makes an attack, the newsmaker would be able to react in a cool and collected manner.

My second piece of advice would be to anticipate the reporter’s questions and have materials ready as the reporter probably has a fixed time for the interview and then must go. Thus, the newsmaker should brainstorm the kinds of questions a reporter is likely to ask ahead of time. This means understanding why the reporter is there - be it to find a hidden story to simply to get more information - as well as going back to the 5W1H, which is the formula for a reporter’s questions.

Lastly, I would remind the newsmaker that not all information need be provided to the reporter as some information is private. In the event that the reporter poses such questions, the newsmaker can simply choose not to answer.

3. What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?

Most important to note would be crafting press releases are are newsworthy, specific and tailored to the intended media. As previously mentioned, print media allows for more in-depth coverage as more time and space are available. Television focuses on visuals, thus the message has to be succinct and attractively packaged. As for the internet, the writing style should be short, with bright bits of information targeted at an audience with a limited attention span.

Crafting a concise press release that cuts to the chase and provides the journalist with what is needed is another important step. If press releases sent by your organisation does not clearly explain the objective of the story, future press releases may well go unread. This ties in with not trying to sell the media on a product or service, but instead pitch them a unique story. This way, your press release stands out from the stack of many other press releases that often go unread.

Finally, actually developing a relationship with the media. This can be as simple as taking the reporter who wrote a story for the organisation to coffee and sending greeting cards during festivities. These small actions will hopefully mean the journalist remembering you and being more open to looking at your your future press releases.


#15

1.How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)? My approach would be similar to Arit Essien’s by using the fundamental steps she created to provide positive public relations relationships. 1. Adhere to and be conscientious of deadlines: Nothing can be more irritating to an editor or producer than to receive pitches while under the pressure of a tight deadline. Media and PR professionals must understand each of the outlets that they work with, as well as how they are structured and their timelines.

  1. Be relevant: Why is an artist’s hot new hit single being announced to a healthcare reporter? Why is a publicist sending press releases to an undedicated media list? Why is Chicago news going to New York outlets? Bulk messages are a quick way to get relegated to spam folders. Media members will actually seek content from PR sources that consistently deliver relevant and newsworthy information.

  2. Speak the right language: We are in a diverse world with various cultures and tongues, however when it comes to media relations, each outlet has a specific style and content preference. If you are submitting content for television, perhaps your submission should be formatted as a video news release. If you are submitting content to a print publication, perhaps your submission should be an AP style article. An effective publicist knows how to package information so that it can easily be used.

  3. Research, research, and again research: Very few things can escape the requirement of research. Marketing, healthcare, law, education, determining which fabric softener gets clothes fluffier … When creating a media list for example, it is hardly strategic to pull every national outlet. Which publication recently featured your client? What television show has a demographic that aligns with your client’s demographic? Which journalist covers a topic that fits your area of focus?

  4. Finally, play nice. Yes, it’s kindergarten and extremely basic, but friendliness does go a long way. Relationships can be honed through simple courtesies like thank you and even how is your day going (but not during media deadlines!) Take an extra second with every encounter to personalize the interaction and to demonstrate appreciation – after all, so much of what we do relies upon what they do.

2.What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter? Do as much research as you can about the reporter interviewing you. You want to know the questions you’ll be asked because you don’t want to be blind-sided and caught off guard. You want to prepare for the interview because you’re telling the story about yourself. Be polite. Show gratitude. Sit up straight. Be confident in your answers. Be yourself.

3.What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media? I will make sure I keep great positive relationships with all parties involved in the process. I will also keep and maintain a great public relations staff to ensure the strategies we implement are successful. And to always stay focused and positive.


#16

1.How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?
The approach to get new information out to the public will vary greatly depending on the media.
-Print- Provides more in depth coverage of your news. Be sure to include a catchy headline to increase the chances your article will be read.
-Television- Include images such as still photos or video of your news, with short bits of powerful wording. TV is probably the most expensive form of media so you’ll want to make the best of the on air time. Practice what you want to say.
-Radio- A friend of mine was interviewed on radio. His wife said she didn’t recognize it was him as he sounded so different! Now I know it is because radio dulls the voice, without our actions and expressions included. Practice sounding perky. Lots of inflection in your voice.
-Internet- Web page or Facebook page add Video because video increases the size of the audience. In looking at lots of companies on LinkedIn and Facebook one thing I notice quite frequently is that the companies get very few LIKES. I believe it was one of Richard Branson’s articles that said to increase your following, you must follow and be active on other company’s profiles. I would look at ways to increase “following” numbers! You’ll need to be actively commenting on your suppliers pages, your customer sites, or community sites, for several hours a day to increase your numbers.

2.What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?
The reporter could be a newspaper reporter, a radio personality or TV reporter.
Newspaper- Be prepared and have the points that you want to get across written in front of you, so you can keep referring back to your reason for being interviewed. Remember that news reporters, although in a time crunch for deadlines, are not timing your interview down to the minute. If they keep you talking for too long they may lead you away from your news story. Nothing is “off the record” so be careful with your words. Set a time limited yourself and end the interview once your point has been made.
Radio - Being interviewed on radio, again, have the points that you want to get across written in front of you. Always be prepared for am ambush and using the “word bridge” to come back to your news story. Take your time to answer questions. Keep your message simple and be enthusiastic .
TV- Again be prepared with the point you want to convey to the audience. Be calm and look at the interviewer rather than the camera. Dress for success and don’t wear strips or white. Blue is best and no jewelry to adversely affect the microphone.

3.What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?
Always call to thank the interviewer. Send them news bites. Develop relationships with reporters. Keep tabs on where reporters are, which company they are now with. Always be truthful.


#17

How might you change your approach to media relations based on the type of news outlet you hope to pitch (print, broadcast, online)?

Different approaches are taken depending on the news outlets. In traditional print media, more in depth coverage is provided by reporters. Provide them with details and give them prepared releases, press packets, quotes. For broadcast like TV and radio, provide lots of visuals with quotes and sound bites. There’s also opportunity for more accessible coverage with talk shows, news and public affairs programs. As for online, companies can take their message directly to their customers and public through self-generated online content. The company can provide a controlled message to a worldwide audience quickly, efficiently, and economically.

What advice would you provide to a newsmaker who is about to be interviewed by a reporter?

One technique is called a “bridge.” This is a phrase that allows you to make effective transitions.
So, instead of answering a question with one message and stopping, you can bridge to each of your other messages. Examples: “That’s a good point, but the key issue is.” " In addition, our research shows." "Not only have we grown profits, but we’ve also."
The other device is called a “flag.” You use a flag to signal to your audience that a particular point is critical. For instance, in answering a question about your area of expertise, you might say, “The most important thing for people to remember is.” “The critical issue is.” “The focus of the debate is.”

What are the steps you might take to ensure ongoing and productive relations with the media?

First try to get to know those your will need in the media. Take them coffee, out to eat or just try to get to know them. Learn all you can about the people you will need in the media so you can be prepared on their expectation such as length of article, when it is due and any other details that could keep you for getting the article printed. Find out what types of stories each one will print so you don’t waste your time or their time with a story they would never print. Always be on time, create accurate articles with no grammar issues and be available immediately for follow up questions. Always be nice and professional.